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How Your Beliefs Can Help You or Hurt You

Hello BICS Families! 

I want to take a few minutes to share an exciting initiative regarding fostering a “Growth Mindset” that we are undertaking as a staff.   At BICS, we want to instill all our students with the belief that they may achieve great things with hard work and a sincere belief in their own capabilities and talents.  Research repeatedly shows that effort is the greatest determiner to future success.  Please take a few moments to read the fallowing article summarizing some of the key concepts behind the development of a growth mindset.

 

How Your Beliefs Can Help You or Hurt You

Carol Dweck is a researcher at Stanford University.

 

Dweck is well–known for her work on “the fixed mindset vs. the growth mindset.” Here’s how Dweck describes the difference between these two mindsets and how they impact your performance…

 

In a fixed mindset students believe their basic abilities, their intelligence, their talents, are just fixed traits. They have a certain amount and that’s that, and then their goal becomes to look smart all the time and never look dumb. In a growth mindset students understand that their talents and abilities can be developed through effort, good teaching and persistence. They don’t necessarily think everyone’s the same or anyone can be Einstein, but they believe everyone can get smarter if they work at it. 


 - Carol Dweck, Stanford University

 

The benefits of a growth mindset might seem obvious, but most of us are guilty of having a fixed mindset in certain situations. That can be dangerous because a fixed mindset can often prevent important skill development and growth, which could sabotage your health and happiness down the line.

 

For example, if you say, “I’m not a math person” then that belief acts as an easy excuse to avoid practicing math. The fixed mindset prevents you from failing in the short–run, but in the long–run it hinders your ability to learn, grow, and develop new skills.

 

Meanwhile, someone with a growth mindset would be willing to try math problems even if they failed at first. They see failure and setbacks as an indication that they should continue developing their skills rather than a signal that indicates, “This is something I’m not good at.”

 

As a result, people who have a growth mindset are more likely maximize their potential. They tend to learn from criticism rather than ignoring it, to overcome challenges rather than avoiding them, and to find inspiration in the success of others rather than feeling threatened.

 

The following are some examples of positive self-talk that can serve as models for your children:

 

 

 

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